You need to help deal with your man’s health

The male cancer charity  Orchid are trying to raise awareness of the symptoms and signs of the 3 male specific cancers – penile, prostrate and testicular,  in order that they seek advice as soon as possible.

Orchid have revealed in their latest research that almost half of all men would prefer to be checked by their partners for the signs of testicular cancer than their GP.

Testicular cancer most commonly occurs in young men aged 15-45 and affects almost 2000 men a year. If it caught early enough however, the common male cancer has a 95% cure rate, but will have spread in over 1/3 cases before its been diagnosed.
With this in mind, Orchid are keen to encourage women to get more involved in their loved ones health, especially as almost three quarters (62%) of the men questioned revealed that although they would prefer their partner to carry out these vital checks, they never do.

The new survey also found that ‘embarrassment’ is a key barrier that stops men from making potentially lifesaving appointments with their GP for a testicle check-up.
Testicular cancer sufferer William Gingell was diagnosed at 17, he says:

‘I really owe my life to my girlfriend, it was her who found the lump in my testicle and without her encouragement and support I know I would have been far too embarrassed to make an appointment with my GP to get it checked out. I think this campaign is a great idea and wholeheartedly encourage women to check their partners or at least encourage their partners to check themselves; they may just save a life.’

HIS HEALTH IN YOUR HANDS

In light of this new research, Orchid will be continuing ‘His Health In Your Hands’ campaign throughout 2012, which calls on women to be proactive in encouraging their man to be aware of the signs and symptoms of the three male specific cancers – testicular, penile and prostate – so they can seek advice as early as possible.

If you would like more information about Orchid, symptom advice and details on how you can help fight male cancer visit their website www.orchid-cancer.org.uk.